Brexit: Controversial Internal Market Bill to come before parliament TODAY

first_imgHowever, the EU has launched a legal challenge against the legislation and has claimed it could put the Good Friday Agreement in jeopardy. Downing Street has said the bill is essential to protect the flow of trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland if the UK leaves the EU’s customs union without a deal on 31 December. whatsapp Before the Open newsletter: Start your day with the City View podcast and key market data Boris Johnson’s controversial Internal Market Bill, that may breach international law, will come back to MPs today after the House of Lords rejected it. Clauses pertaining to Northern Ireland that will breach the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement, and therefore international law, if there is no post-Brexit UK-EU trade deal were taken out of the bill by peers last month. Also Read: Brexit: Controversial Internal Market Bill to come before parliament TODAY However, the government has said it will reinsert them when the piece of legislation is brought back to the House of Commons later today. Share Stefan Boscia Monday 7 December 2020 6:41 am Also Read: Brexit: Controversial Internal Market Bill to come before parliament TODAY Show Comments ▼ On Thursday, Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg said the government would be “pushing back” against the House of Lords. “We will be doing the Lords amendments on Monday and we will be pushing back all the amendments which were made in the Lords – including the ones relating to Clause 5 and ensuring that we can put the best interests of the whole United Kingdom first,” he said. MPs will vote on the House of Lords’ changes to the Internal Market Bill on Thursday, with their amendments set to be voted down. Also on the Westminster calendar will be a Health and Science and Technology Committee meeting featuring chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and chief medical officer Christ Whitty. whatsapp The duo will appear at the committee at Wednesday at 9.30am and will speak about “lessons learned” during the Covid pandemic. Brexit: Controversial Internal Market Bill to come before parliament TODAY Northern Ireland will remain in the EU’s customs union next year to ensure there is not a hard border on the island or Ireland that would breach the Good Friday Belfast Agreement. Tags: Brexitlast_img read more

Vertex takes on Huntington’s disease in deal with Ribometrix

first_img Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe Vertex takes on Huntington’s disease in deal with Ribometrix What’s included? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Vertex Pharmaceuticals, the Boston drug maker best known for its cystic fibrosis treatments, continues to branch out, cutting a deal with a North Carolina biotech company that is targeting several serious illnesses, including the fatal genetic disorder Huntington’s disease.In an agreement announced Monday, Vertex will pay Ribometrix $20 million up front to discover and develop at least two RNA-targeted medicines, with an option for a third. Biotech About the Author Reprints What is it? Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe By Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe Sept. 30, 2019 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags biotechnologyBostondrug developmentneurologyrare diseaseSTAT+ GET STARTED Log In | Learn More STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.last_img read more

In Pictures: Portlaoise housing estate enjoy second garden community bingo game

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp By LaoisToday Reporter – 6th May 2020 Facebook Electric Picnic Home News In Pictures: Portlaoise housing estate enjoy second garden community bingo game News Electric Picnic Local communities around the country are coming up with all sorts of inventive ways to keep themselves entertained while adhering to the Government restrictions and observing social distancing amid the Coronavirus pandemic.One such community that came together over the weekend were St Brigid’s Place in Portlaoise – as they organised an outdoor bingo game for the second weekend running.On Sunday afternoon, they organised a game of “garden bingo” while practicing social distancing guidelines and only gathering alongside members of their own household.Once again, the event was driven mainly by Julie O’Shea who sourced about 80 bingo books and an electronic number machine.Well-known local DJ Brochan O’Reilly supplied the mic and speakers for the second weekend running and also called the numbers as people from the estate came out and sat in their gardens.Some came from different parts of the estate and sat in their cars for what was a great event with all the monies made from the sale of bingo books going back to the residents as prizes to those who were lucky enough to check for a line or complete a house.Organisers are hoping to have more events in the coming weeks.Resident Michael Larkin captured some brilliant pictures from the bingo yesterday.Check them out below: SEE ALSO – Check out our Sporting Memories interview series here Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twittercenter_img Pinterest Facebook Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date TAGSbingoCoronavirusCovid-19St Brigid’s Place In Pictures: Portlaoise housing estate enjoy second garden community bingo game WhatsApp Previous articleLISTEN: Laois footballers struggle to see how GAA can resume in July under ‘social distancing’Next articleDeep sadness in Laois following tragic passing of Declan Doocey LaoisToday Reporter Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role News Twitterlast_img read more

Provincial cannabis marketing shows governments taking cautious approach: study

first_imgProvincial cannabis marketing shows governments taking cautious approach: study The provinces have been largely ambivalent to the sale of cannabis and even appear to employ a “demarketing” strategy, according to a University of Alberta look at the branding behind legalization that also showed flexible public policy can be beneficial in times of uncertainty.“Our initial expectation was that governments would be competing fairly effectively with either the private sector or the illicit market,” said Kyle Murray, marketing professor and acting dean of the Alberta School of Business, who conducted the study along with political scientist Jared Wesley in the Faculty of Arts.“We actually thought the government would try to extend what they were already doing in alcohol sales, and build on those brands that have been around for quite a while.“But that isn’t the case; they all basically took a conservative approach to the sales.”For the study, the pair analyzed government brand elements like logos, e-commerce platforms and storefronts. Their analysis included comparing the core elements of each province’s liquor and cannabis brands, with a particular focus on colours, fonts, styles and other stylistic components. The team also conducted interviews with senior public servants in all the provinces and territories, and analyzed how the governments organized themselves internally.Cautious approach to promoting salesFor instance, in Alberta, Murray said he would have predicted that the Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Commission, which added “Cannabis” to its name in 2018, would have extended its brand to sales of cannabis. It did not, opting instead to set up a new brand, Alberta Cannabis. With the exception of Nova Scotia and British Columbia to a lesser extent, the provinces all appeared to distance themselves from their alcohol and gaming brands.“And they all built brands that were competent and sincere, but not particularly exciting, or attractive in terms of getting people to consider buying the product,” he said.“It seemed provinces were saying, ‘We’re here but we don’t really want to sell cannabis.’”Murray noted they even heard some officials in Quebec and Manitoba suggest that, while the sale of cannabis was federally legalized, they were prepared only to do the minimum to sell it.“A big part of the reason to legalize was to put an end to the illicit market, but if you don’t offer something more competitive then it’s really hard to draw sales away from a person’s current drug dealer,” he said.Complex policy changesWesley explained some of this reluctance on the part of the provinces stemmed from the relatively short time horizon—about 18 months—to tackle a staggering number of legislative changes.“The feds really only needed to flip a couple of different policy switches—changing the Criminal Code, adjusting the narcotics acts,” he said. “This is compared to, in Alberta’s case, more than 70 different legislative and regulatory changes that would need to be made to allow people to buy, consume, transport and sell cannabis.”Even the type of government in power didn’t seem to affect marketing practices. Wesley noted most provincial governments at the time that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals were elected were actually fellow progressives.“If you look at the map back then, most of them were either New Democrats or Liberals, including Alberta,” he said. “Trudeau had a bunch of friendly faces around the table, but none of them were really wanting to carry his water on this issue.”Nonetheless, Wesley said never underestimate the government machinery on a deadline.“As much as I say elected officials were ambivalent about legalization, public servants weren’t,” he said. “They were very deliberate in their decisions around how to organize themselves internally to deliver on what was the most complex policy innovation in a generation.”And while it remains to be seen whether legalization meets the stated goals of keeping money out of the hands of organized crime while keeping youth consumption rates low, the “building a plane while flying it” approach to enacting complex public policy seems to be working.“Provincial governments have embraced this notion of continuous improvement in policy-making, and the sky hasn’t fallen,” he said.What also was clear to Murray is that cannabis legalization didn’t do anything to relieve the ongoing tension between a government’s sometimes competing mandates of keeping citizens from harm and finding new sources of revenue.“It would be hard to put the genie back in the bottle if you really pushed everybody to consume cannabis from day one,” said Murray. “I think the provinces are trying to do it in a fairly conservative, slow way and get a sense of what some of the consequences might be, good and bad.“Eventually cannabis marketing will be on par with alcohol and gambling.” /University of Alberta Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:British, cannabis, Commission, Criminal, Democrats’, gambling, gaming, Government, innovation, Justin Trudeau, Minister, Prime Minister, Professor, Transport, university, University of Albertalast_img read more

CU-Boulder research attracts $380.7 million in sponsored funding

first_img Published: Aug. 9, 2012 “The increase in this critical stream is an extremely positive reflection of academic and research advancement at CU,” said CU President Bruce D. Benson. “Our research benefits the greater good in Colorado and beyond, not only in scientific gain, but in economic development.” CU System news releaseDENVER – Work by University of Colorado faculty garnered $815.3 million in sponsored research funding in fiscal year 2011-12, a rise of nearly $22 million over the previous fiscal year.The preliminary figures indicate one of the highest research totals in CU history; the only higher total came in fiscal year 2009-10, when one-time federal stimulus dollars contributed to a final tally of $884.1 million. Last year’s total was $793.5 million.Sponsored research funding from federal, state and local agencies targets specific projects to advance research in laboratories and in the field. Research funding also helps pay for research-related capital improvements, scientific equipment, travel and salaries for research and support staff and student assistantships. CU cannot divert these dollars to fund non-research related expenses such as utilities, compensation, student financial aid or grounds maintenance.“The increase in this critical stream is an extremely positive reflection of academic and research advancement at CU,” said CU President Bruce D. Benson. “Our research benefits the greater good in Colorado and beyond, not only in scientific gain, but in economic development.”Much sponsored research funding is directed to departments and researchers with unique expertise, such as biotechnology and aerospace, which stimulates industry. Via the CU Technology Transfer Office, CU research commercialization has led to the formation of 114 companies, 11 of which were established in fiscal year 2010-11.Fiscal year 2011-12 sponsored research funding across CU, broken down by campus:University of Colorado Boulder, $380.7 million, including a five-year, $4.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to a CU-Boulder-led team working to better understand the electrical processes that connect the Earth with the atmosphere and with space. Among the effort’s goals are to improve data resolution and modeling capabilities to more realistically simulate complex processes and forecast disruptive events that may affect the planet’s environment.University of Colorado Colorado Springs, more than $5 million, including a five-year, $954,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy for the development of courses to prepare engineers for careers in developing new technologies in the design and implementation of electric vehicle drivetrains. The master’s-level courses will be taught by faculty from UCCS and CU-Boulder.University of Colorado Denver, $22.3 million, including a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of English Language Acquisition and its National Professional Development program. Faculty at CU Denver’s School of Education and Human Development will lead the creation of online and professional communities in an effort to improve academic achievement, especially in the areas of math and science education for multilingual learners in urban K-12 schools.University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, $407.3 million, including a three-year, $1.5 million award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to create the Center for Excellence in Research in Implementation Science and Prevention (CRISP). Primary care and public health experts will team for research on ways to improve preventive health services within primary health care settings.The University of Colorado is a premier public research university with four campuses: the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, the University of Colorado Denver and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Some 58,000 students are pursuing academic degrees at CU. Academic prestige is marked by the university’s four Nobel laureates, seven MacArthur “genius” Fellows, 18 alumni astronauts and 19 Rhodes Scholars. For more information about the entire CU system, and to access campus resources, go to www.cu.edu.Contact: Jay Dedrick, 303-968-8768, [email protected] Categories:Science & TechnologyNews Headlines Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

The unseen microbial world of amphibian skin

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail By Trent Knoss • Published: March 27, 2019 A far-reaching global study led by CU Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments.The findings, recently published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, are the result of the largest geographical study of the amphibian microbiome in history, with dozens of researchers from 31 institutions combining to sample over 2,300 specimens, encompassing 205 species in 12 countries on five continents.Amphibian dermal microbes are known to shape their hosts’ health and physiology, but the patterns and prevalence of these communities have remained poorly understood at a global scale. Amphibians have become increasingly threatened by habitat losses and fungal infections in recent decades, leading to greater research emphasis on environmental factors that could either help or hinder their survival.Surprisingly, the new study found that while amphibian species diversity tends to increase in temperate and tropical areas of the world, microbial diversity does the opposite.  The American bullfrog, a widely distributed species whose habitat range spans the globe, proved representative of this phenomenon. The researchers sampled 139 bullfrogs from various locales such as Brazil, Japan, South Korea and the United States, finding that those who experienced lower minimum temperatures during the coldest month of the year had greater bacterial diversity than their fair-weather brethren. The bullfrogs’ microbes also proved to be highly local in character, with just a single bacterium remaining constant among 80 percent of the worldwide specimens and no evidence of an underlying “core” community.“Bullfrogs are native to eastern North America, but they have become invasive all over the world, which gives us a chance to examine how the microbes of one type of frog compare across very different environments,” said Valerie McKenzie, a co-author of the study and an associate professor in CU Boulder’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO). “We thought that the bullfrogs from different places might share more microbes in common, but instead, they are influenced very strongly by their local habitat and climate”The researchers hypothesize that warmer temperatures may encourage faster microbial turnover on the amphibians’ skin, leading a few dominant bacteria to quickly conquer and squash diversity. By contrast, colder temperatures may encourage dormancy among some microbes, thwarting the possibility for rapid takeover and allowing for bacterial cycling throughout the year.The findings could influence future research into amphibian health and resiliency, especially in sub-alpine regions where species such as the boreal toad in the western United States face ongoing threats from climate change-related temperature changes and deadly infections.“Given the importance of temperature in this large analysis, we have new leads to examine patterns across elevation gradients in our mountain habitats and how those influence microbes and animal health,” McKenzie said. Categories:EnvironmentNews Headlineslast_img read more

FAO provides US$480,000 to address citrus greening disease

first_imgRelatedFAO provides US$480,000 to address citrus greening disease RelatedFAO provides US$480,000 to address citrus greening disease RelatedFAO provides US$480,000 to address citrus greening disease FAO provides US$480,000 to address citrus greening disease AgricultureNovember 17, 2010center_img Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The local citrus industry has received some much-needed assistance from the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) to tackle citrus greening disease, which has been severely impacting the island over the past two years.Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Dr. Christopher Tufton and FAO representative for Jamaica, Bahamas and Belize, Dr. Jerome Thomas, this morning (November 16) signed a US$480,000 agreement to provide an array of technical support to the industry.Speaking at the signing, which was held at the Ministry’s Hope Garden’s premises in Kingston, Dr. Tufton said the presence of the citrus greening disease was threatening the livelihood of those linked to the industry.Even before the discovery of the disease in the island two years ago, citrus production had dropped from 140 tonnes in 2003 to 122,000 in 2008, which the Minister blamed on a range of factors including the citrus tristeza virus, adverse weather conditions, less than optimal management, aging farmers and declining acreages.Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Dr. Christopher Tufton (centre) and Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Representative for Jamaica, Bahamas and Belize, Dr. Jerome Thomas, sign the US$480,000 agreement, which will see the FAO providing an array of technical support to the citrus industry to fight the devastating citrus greening disease. Observing the signing is Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Donovan Stanberry.“We appealed to the FAO and they responded and have agreed on an 18-month programme, focusing on diagnostic detection, collaboration, training and upgrading, facilitation, and the production of disease-free materials for nurseries in order to expand the production of citrus plants, and do so in a way that is resistance to the citrus greening challenge that we face,” the Minister outlined.The programme activities will involve mobilising citrus stakeholders, working with the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) and the Citrus Growers Association, to facilitate field visits; provision of laboratory space to facilitate training; provision of site nurseries and technicians and research assistance; coordination of training events; and administrative support. Biological support programmes will also be examined, including monitoring.“For us, these resources are very well-timed,” Minister Tufton said, expressing gratitude and support to the FAO.He said the citrus industry is extremely valuable to the country in terms of earnings and employment.“It has an estimated value of some $4 billion. Over 95 per cent of total citrus production is utilised locally for the fresh fruit market or in processing, while approximately four or five per cent is exported. On farm employment is estimated at about 6,000 persons.overall directly and indirectly, you’re looking at about 19,000 or close to 20,000 jobs,” he pointed out.Technical Director at the Citrus Growers Association, Percy Miller, told JIS News that his organisation welcomed the funds, and expressed the desire for the benefits to impact the industry in an expedient manner.He said that the citrus greening diseases, is fairly new to Jamaica, and that the pattern is being examined.“We see where, for example, limes are the most affected. For the past two years since we have noticed the disease, what we are noticing is that the species most impacted is limes.but we really haven’t yet got the complete picture,” he noted.last_img read more

Engineers Urged to Take Advantage of Available Global Best Practices

first_imgRelatedJUTC to Add 100 Buses to KMTR Monday Local engineers are being encouraged to take full advantage of the global best practices that are being made available in Jamaica, through major infrastructure development projects, such as the North South Link of Highway 2000.“We operate in a global context where the sharing of ideas and technology transfer has become quite important. This exchange will not only redound to your benefit, but ultimately to that of the country,” Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of  Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Dr. Morais Guy, said Thursday, September 4, as he launched  Engineers Week 2014, at the University of Technology (UTech), in Kingston.He further noted that the introduction of new technologies has become important in providing more cost effective solutions.“This is seen right across government where there are efforts to provide more cost effective and more efficient products to our citizens,” Dr. Guy said, pointing out that in the  Ministry, alternative avenues are being explored to provide more cost effective means of housing construction, roadwork design and building, bridges, and other forms of infrastructure.He cited the recent directive issued to the National Works Agency (NWA) that tenders for road construction and rehabilitation should factor alternate bids for concrete pavement design.Dr. Guy said the role of engineers has become even more important, given the evolution of new environmental concerns, such as the threat of multiple natural and manmade disasters, including hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes, and the resulting  instances where there is poor planning and improper engineering techniques.He also highlighted the importance of engineers in the design and engineering of alternative sources of energy, which is opening up new possibilities  for the energy sector, and which has positive implications for energy cost and usage.“Your profession plays a defining role in the way we develop both on a rural level as well as in the urban centres. The concern of overcrowding in our cities and the attendant health hazard, are real problems that lay before you as new challenges to be addressed in engineering for the future,” the Minister said.He told the gathering that this year’s theme: ‘Engineering Change’,  captures and reflects the concepts of the shift that is taking place globally in industrialization, production and trade, as it relates to engineering.Engineering Week 2014 (September 21-28), which is being spearheaded by the Jamaica Institution of Engineers (JEI), will feature a slate of activities, including a Thanksgiving Service on September 21 at the Holy Rosary Catholic Church, at 9 Gibbs Avenue off Windward Road in Kingston; a three-day conference at the Knutsford Court Hotel, beginning on September 22; site visit to the Magotty Hydro Power Plant in St. Elizabeth on September 27; and the staging of  the ‘Race for Hope’, proceeds of which will go towards the refurbishing of the Hope Botanical Gardens. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedJUTC Rolls Out Vehicle Tracking System Tomorrow RelatedToll to Start on North South Highway on September 6 Engineers Urged to Take Advantage of Available Global Best PracticesJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaycenter_img Story HighlightsLocal engineers are being encouraged to take full advantage of the global best practices that are being made available in Jamaica, through major infrastructure development projects.“We operate in a global context where the sharing of ideas and technology transfer has become quite important,” Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Dr. Morais Guy, saidHe further noted that the introduction of new technologies has become important in providing more cost effective solutions. Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Dr. Morais Guy (right), in discussion with Acting President of the University of Technology, Ambassador Burchell Whiteman (centre) and President of the Jamaica Institution of engineers (JIE), Dr. Noel Brown, at the launch of Engineers’ Week 2014, at the University of Technology (UTech), on September 4. Engineering Week 2014 is being observed from September 21 to 28. Engineers Urged to Take Advantage of Available Global Best Practices TransportSeptember 4, 2014Written by: Alphea Saunders Advertisementslast_img read more

PM Gives Instruction for Public Release of Health Sector Audit Report

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedCaymanas to Linstead Highway 80 Per Cent Complete RelatedJamaicans Realising Home Ownership Dream Through Sugar Barracks Relocation Programme PM Gives Instruction for Public Release of Health Sector Audit Report Office of the Prime MinisterNovember 5, 2015Written by: OPM Communications Unit PM Gives Instruction for Public Release of Health Sector Audit ReportJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: JIS PhotographerPrime Minister the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller.center_img Story HighlightsPrime Minister Portia Simpson Miller has given instructions for the Minister of Health Dr. Fenton Ferguson to publish to the nation tomorrow, Friday, November 6 the report of an audit of the Health sector.The decision was taken at a Partnership for Jamaica National Council at a meeting at the Office of the Prime Minister on Thursday, November 5, 2015.The report will be published on the website of the Ministry of Health and made available to the media. RelatedMinister Natalie Neita Headley Applauds JAAA For The Launch Of Its Athletes’ Development Fund Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller has given instructions for the Minister of Health Dr. Fenton Ferguson to publish to the nation tomorrow, Friday, November 6, (earlier than originally planned) the report of an audit of the Health sector which the Minister had commissioned earlier this year. The decision was taken at a Partnership for Jamaica National Council at a meeting at the Office of the Prime Minister on Thursday, November 5, 2015. The report will be published on the website of the Ministry of Health and made available to the media.The Partnership for Jamaica National Council comprise the Government; trade unions; the private sector; and civil society, which includes representatives from the church, women’s organisations, human rights and environmental groups, and the youth.The partners contended that there was an issue of perception that needed to be addressed by way of issuing the report sooner than the originally planned release next week. “The Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) has continued to advocate for transparency in all areas as a prerequisite for good governance.  The result of today’s Partnership Council meeting was to reinforce that, and we are pleased that the honourable Minister of Health has agreed to release the audit tomorrow in a move to improve this trust amongst civil society and the government,” said PSOJ President William Mahfood.The Prime Minister said that “it was important to release the audit at this time. There is no attempt on the part of the Government to cover up anything. Today, we had a good productive meeting with the Partnership for Jamaica which consistently provides a platform for open and transparent discussions that generate understanding on national issues.”Minister Ferguson also provided a comprehensive update on the improvements being undertaken in the health sector.Other matters discussed by the Council included national security and the campaign finance reform bill. Advertisementslast_img read more

Complimentary ‘telehealth’ subscription extended

first_img In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Member Benefits, the administrator of The Florida Bar Private Insurance Exchange, is extending its complimentary telehealth program to all members of The Florida Bar until the end of May.“There’s an urgency to help people in need of routine medical care while limiting their risk of the exposure to the virus. Telehealth can be an essential and safe alternative for basic health care that can do just that,” said Nicklaus Trefry, CEO of Member Benefits. “We recognize that while some members may have access to a similar service through their insurance or health-care providers, there are also some who may not – so we’re trying to help those in need of access to such a service.”Benefits of this telehealth service include:24/7 access to medical care by phone, video, or appUnlimited virtual visits with board-certified physicians and pediatriciansCare for more than 50 routine health conditionsCan also be used by dependent family membersPrescriptions sent electronically to your pharmacy$45 per virtual visit for complimentary planUpon expiration of the complimentary period (5/31/20) members who wish to continue their telehealth service will have the option to purchase an ongoing subscription – but are under no obligation to do so.For plan information and online enrollment, visit https://floridabar.memberbenefits.com/telehealth. Complimentary ‘telehealth’ subscription extended May 17, 2020 Regular Newslast_img read more