Pilot Begins to Determine Prevalence of COPD

first_imgPilot Begins to Determine Prevalence of COPD Health & WellnessJuly 15, 2014Written by: Peta-Gay Hodges Pilot Begins to Determine Prevalence of COPDJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: JIS PhotographerPrincipal Investigator in the University of the West Indies Department of Medicine Pulmonary Research Group, Dr. Althea Aquart-Stewart. (FILE) RelatedHealth Minister Impacts UN General Assembly RelatedRegional Authorities to Improve Communication with Staff RelatedExpanded Haemodialysis Unit at Cornwall Regional to be Operational by Septembercenter_img The Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the University of the West Indies (UWI) Department of Medicine Pulmonary Research Group, has begun the pilot of a $20-million project, aimed at determining the prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).In an interview with JIS News, Principal Investigator in the research group, Dr. Althea Aquart-Stewart, said that the pilot for the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) Project would take place over a three-week period, with mapping in two primary sampling units.“We will be going into unit 34, which is the Washington Boulevard, Weymouth Drive and Riverton area and unit 35, which is the Bog Walk, Linstead, Rio Cobre region. I am appealing to the residents to co-operate with us,” she urged.The pilot, which began with mapping on July 7, is being conducted on every sixth household and involves the issuance of questionnaires to persons in the 18 to 39 age group in 84 primary sampling units across the island.Spirometry tests will be administered on persons within the same households that are over the age of 40.“Spirometry is a test that involves the patient breathing into an instrument that looks at air flow and other key factors and a doctor will always be on hand to ensure correct diagnoses,” Dr. Aquart-Stewart said, adding that the tests will be used to diagnose COPD, which is one of the leading tobacco-induced diseases.The Principal Investigator said that persons in the over 40 age group would also be issued with a questionnaire; however it would be different from that issued to the younger cohort.Dr. Aquart-Stewart explained that the research, which is being funded jointly by the National Health Fund and the (UWI) Principal’s Initiative Fund, will be conducted over an six-month period.“It will provide Jamaicans with hard evidence of the prevalence of COPD and the burden of tobacco use and exposure to other environmental pollutants,” she said.She pointed out that the project will also be used to establish information on the economic burden of the disease in the 18 to 39 age group by looking at factors, such as the recurrent costs of doctors’ visits, medication and productive time lost. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsThe Ministry of Health has begun the pilot of a $20-million project, aimed at determining the prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).In an interview with JIS News, Principal Investigator in the research group, Dr. Althea Aquart-Stewart, said that the pilot for the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) Project would take place over a three-week period, with mapping in two primary sampling units.The pilot is being conducted on every sixth household and involves the issuance of questionnaires to persons in the 18 to 39 age group in 84 primary sampling units across the island. Advertisementslast_img read more

Study finds brain architecture alters to compensate for depression

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook LinkedIn Share Emailcenter_img Share on Twitter Patients were randomized to receive active medication duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, or placebo. During the trial, patients receiving medication experienced significant improvement of symptoms compared with patients receiving placebo. In medication-treated patients, cortical thickness declined toward values found in healthy volunteers while placebo-treated patients showed a slight thickening of the cortex. According to Bansal, a researcher at CHLA and professor of pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, this finding suggests that placebo-treated patients continue to require compensation for their ongoing symptoms.“Although this study was conducted in adults, the methodology developed – pairing a randomized controlled trial with MRI scanning – can be applied to many other populations in both children and adults,” said Bansal. “Also, our observations of neuroplasticity suggest new biological targets for treatment of persons with neuropsychiatric disorders.” A study led by Ravi Bansal, PhD, and Bradley S. Peterson, MD, of The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has found structural differences in the cerebral cortex of patients with depression and that these differences normalize with appropriate medication. The study, published in Molecular Psychiatry on March 7, is the first to report within the context of a randomized, controlled trial, the presence of structural changes in the cerebral cortex during medication treatment for depression and the first to provide in vivo evidence for the presence of anatomical neuroplasticity in human brain.“Our findings suggest that thickening of the cerebral cortex is a compensatory, neuroplastic response that helps to reduce the severity of depressive symptoms,” said Peterson, director of the Institute of the Developing Mind at CHLA and professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. “Patients off medication have a thickened cortex, and the thicker it is, the fewer the symptoms they have. Treatment with medication then reduces the severity of symptoms, which in turn reduces the need for biological compensation in the brain – so that their cortex becomes thinner, reaching thickness values similar to those in healthy volunteers.”The investigators acquired anatomical brain scans at baseline and again at the end of the 10-week study period for 41 patients with chronic depression, while 39 healthy volunteers were scanned once. This study was conducted with adult patients treated at Columbia University, when Peterson and Bansal were faculty members.last_img read more