‘Ovarian cancer bus’ revealed

first_imgA bus highlighting the symptoms of ovarian cancer has been launched by Lothian Buses, following campaigning by Lothian engineering worker Colin Barclay – who lost his wife Jill to ovarian cancer.He was voted Lothian’s Unsung Hero at the company’s People Awards, and part of his award was to receive his very own bus to help his campaign to raise awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms.The operator launched the “ovarian cancer bus” in partnership with the charity, Target Ovarian Cancer.last_img

VFCU collects over 6,000 lbs of food for local food shelf

first_imgVermont Business Magazine On Saturday, November 19, Vermont Federal Credit Union was the presenting sponsor of the Feed Your Neighbor Food Drive to benefit the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf. Vermont Federal joined radio stations 99.9 The Buzz and 106.7 WIZN at Costco in Colchester, from 10 AM to 4 PM, to support the Feed Your Neighbor Food Drive. Credit Union staff spent the day collecting non-perishable food items as well as cash donations, to benefit the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf. Volunteers provided suggested items to donate and those who contributed received reusable Vermont Federal tote bags as a thank you.VFCU photo of Jean Giard helping out.This year’s food drive raised 4,096 pounds of food and $736.60 in cash, equating to 2,209.80 additional pounds of food for a total of 6,305.8 pounds donated.“The annual Feed Your Neighbor Food Drive is critical for our organization as we work to make sure that all of our neighbors have the opportunity to share a full Thanksgiving meal with their loved ones,” said Kelly Saunders, Development Director at the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf. Saunders added, “We are so grateful for the support of the event sponsors, volunteers and community members whose generosity has made this event such a success.”The Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf works to alleviate hunger by feeding people and cultivating opportunities. As the largest direct service emergency food provider in Vermont, the Food Shelf serves approximately 11,000 people every year. You can learn more about the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf by visiting www.feedingchittenden.org(link is external).Vermont Federal is a $469 million-plus financial institution, with six locations currently serving over 36,000 members. Members are part of a cooperative, meaning they share ownership in the Credit Union and elect a volunteer board of directors. Vermont Federal Credit Union provides membership to anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Chittenden, Grand Isle, Lamoille, Franklin, Washington, or Addison Counties in Vermont. Vermont Federal Credit Union is committed to providing support to the communities it serves and to make a decided difference in the lives of its members and other Vermonters.  For more information about Vermont Federal Credit Union, call (888) 252-0202, visitwww.vermontfederal.org(link is external), or find us on Facebook(link is external).Source: Burlington, VT – Vermont Federal Credit Union 11.30.2016,Yeslast_img read more

Low glycemic index diet reduces symptoms of autism in mice

first_imgShare Email Pinterest Share on Facebook LinkedIncenter_img More people may be diagnosed due to a broader definition of autism and better efforts in diagnosis, but a true increase in the disorder cannot be ruled out, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Lifestyle change is one potential factor out of many possible causes of autism.‘One thing that’s driving a lot of general physiological changes in people is changes in the diet,’ says the study’s corresponding author Pamela Maher, a senior staff scientist in the laboratory of professor David Schubert at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.In the new study, the Salk scientists used a mouse model of autism — an inbred strain of mouse previously found to display autism-like symptoms — to ask whether lowering the level of dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (a common byproduct of sugar metabolism) could alleviate symptoms of autism in the animals.The scientists fed pregnant mice either the high or low glycemic index diet and kept their offspring on the same diet after birth and weaning, because their brains are still forming crucial connections.The researchers then used a battery of behavioral and biochemical tests to study the mice after weaning. The two groups of animals consumed the same number of calories and were identical in weight. But mice that ate a high-glycemic index diet showed all of the expected behavioral symptoms of autism. Their social interactions were impaired, they repeated actions that served no apparent purpose, and they groomed extensively.The mouse models of autism on a normal lab diet (with a medium glycemic index) are already known to generate fewer new neurons, and some of their existing cells and neuronal connections are abnormal compared with those of normal mice.Intriguingly, in the new study, the brains of mice modeling autism that were fed the high-glycemic index diet had drastically less doublecortin, a protein indicator of newly developing neurons, compared to predisposed mice on the low-glycemic index diet. The deficiency was especially obvious in a part of the brain that controls memory.In addition, the brains of the high-glycemic index diet mice appeared to have greater numbers of activated microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain. Their brains also expressed more genes associated with inflammation, compared to the mice fed the low-glycemic index diet.Other studies of human mothers and their children with autism have implicated the activation of the immune system. For the most part, these studies have focused on infection, which causes a bout of inflammation — as opposed to a high-glycemic index diet, which causes chronic, low-level inflammation, Maher says.The new study found that the diet might directly influence the ecosystem of bacteria in the gut. More complex starches are broken down by bacteria that live in the lower part of the gut, the large intestine. The group saw some evidence of that in the blood, detecting metabolites that could only have come from the gut in larger amounts in the animals fed the high-glycemic index diet.‘We were really surprised when we found molecules in the blood that others had reported could only be generated by gut bacteria,’ Maher says. ‘There were big differences in some of these compounds between the two diets.’The group plans to analyze the gut bacteria, and its potential link with features of autism, more directly. They also hope to better understand the role of inflammation in the ability to generate new neurons.Lastly, they plan to vary the timing of exposure to the various diets in the mouse model of autism, by, for example, giving pregnant mice a high-glycemic index diet and then keeping their pups on a normal diet. Bread, cereal and other sugary processed foods cause rapid spikes and subsequent crashes in blood sugar. In contrast, diets made up of vegetables, fruits and whole grains are healthier, in part because they take longer to digest and keep us more even-keeled.New research in a mouse model of autism showed that such low glycemic index diets, similar to the plans that people with diabetes follow to keep their blood sugar in check, reduced symptoms of the disorder in mice. Although preliminary and not yet tested in humans, the findings, published June 9 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, might offer clues to understanding one potential cause of autism.The number of people diagnosed with autism — a spectrum of disorders characterized by social avoidance, repetitive behaviors and difficulty communicating — has risen dramatically over the past two decades for reasons that are unclear. Share on Twitterlast_img read more

St. Anthony, St. Rose Alter Society cookbooks for sale; CPR classes offered by Wellington Fire/EMS

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Sumner Newscow report — The St. Anthony St. Rose Altar Society is conducting a cookbook fundraiser. This isn’t your everyday cookbook, it is a cookbook with recipes of the 1948 St. Anthony St. Rose Altar Society members! This reproduction is being dedicated to Wanda Roths, an active member of the Altar Society for many years, who passed away recently, and whose memorials were to the Altar Society.Also included in the book is the famous roll recipe that was served at St. Anthony School and made by former school cook, Mary Lou Goodrum. Pre-orders can be made by emailing [email protected] or calling Betty Zeka at 620-960-1153. Cost is $10 if ordered before July 31. After July 31 – $15. $3.25 added per book if they are to be mailed. When the books are delivered a date, location and time for pick-up will be announced.————The Wellington Fire/EMS department is holding CPR Classes for the public will be held July 17 at 6 p.m. Free to the public, but if you want to get certified the card cost is $20. To enroll call 620-326-7443.If you have a public service announcement, contact us at [email protected] us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more