Pacific Northwest Day Trips: The Columbia River Gorge

first_imgName*Email*Website Name*Email*Website guestLabel 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all comments Set out on a journey through time and beauty in the natural wonder of Washington and Oregon’s shared river gorge CORBETT, Ore. — Fall is on it’s way, but there is still plenty of perfect weather for a journey through the natural beauty of the Columbia River Gorge.This time on the ClarkCountyToday.com Day Trip Series, we travel past towering waterfalls, breathtaking lookouts, rugged trails, jagged cliff sides, rushing water, and rich history.Dozens of wonderful spots can be found in the gorge, on both the Washington and Oregon side of the river. We’ve mapped out some of our favorites, and created another short film to give you a taste of what’s out there waiting for you.Be sure to let us know what your favorite locations are, and share your pictures with us on social media using the hashtag, #cctdaytrip. From all of us at Clark County Today, we hope you have incredible adventures day tripping across your home, here in the Pacific Northwest.Here are our favorite spots to check out:1. Troutdale Exit to Scenic HighwayThe gateway to all the wonders of the Oregon sideLarge swaths of land covered in trees, flowers and trailsEasily accessible directly from I-84 EastSome trails damaged/closed due to 2017 fires, see website above  The Columbia River Gorge at dawn, looking east. Photo by Mike SchultzThe Columbia River Gorge at sunset, looking east. Photo by Mike Schultz2. Women’s Forum ViewpointFirst stop on the drive through the Oregon sideGood parking, and excellent view looking eastward through the gorgeHistoric plaques and walking areaThe Vista House on Crown Point can be seen here from the vantage point of the Women’s Forum Viewpoint. Photo by Mike SchultzThe Vista House on Crown Point can be seen here from the vantage point of the Women’s Forum Viewpoint. Photo by Mike Schultz 3. Vista House at Crown PointOver 100-year-old rest area along U.S. 30Now houses museum, store and caféLarge balcony with superb views looking west and east through the gorgeAdequate parking during the week and on weekendsThe over 100-year-old Vista House , seen here, was originally a rest stop, and now serves as a viewing area and museum. Photo by Mike SchultzThe over 100-year-old Vista House , seen here, was originally a rest stop, and now serves as a viewing area and museum. Photo by Mike SchultzSeen here is a view of the Columbia River Gorge looking eastward from atop the Vista House. Photo by Jacob GrannemanSeen here is a view of the Columbia River Gorge looking eastward from atop the Vista House. Photo by Jacob Granneman4. Latourell FallsEasy hike with accessible roadside parkingBeautiful waterfall, falling nearly 250 feetRugged trail end, with the option to go right up to the cascading waterLatourell Falls is the first waterfall along the U.S. 30 route. Photo by Mike SchultzLatourell Falls is the first waterfall along the U.S. 30 route. Photo by Mike SchultzReporter Jacob Granneman, braves the icy spray of the falls here, in order to film the waterfall from below. Photo by Bailey GrannemanReporter Jacob Granneman, braves the icy spray of the falls here, in order to film the waterfall from below. Photo by Bailey GrannemanLatourell Falls, seen here in winter, drops nearly 250 feet. Photo by Mike SchultzLatourell Falls, seen here in winter, drops nearly 250 feet. Photo by Mike Schultz5. Bridal Veil FallsLarge rest area with parking and accessible viewpoint of the gorgeMulti-level waterfall with gravel trails ascending and descending the hillsideNear Shepard’s Dell viewing area and historic bridgesBridal-Veil-Falls-Columbia-River-Gorge-01) Shown here is a long exposure of Bridal Veil Falls, which lies on U.S. 30 just past Latourell. Photo by Mike SchultzBridal-Veil-Falls-Columbia-River-Gorge-01) Shown here is a long exposure of Bridal Veil Falls, which lies on U.S. 30 just past Latourell. Photo by Mike Schultz6. Wahkeena FallsRoadside parking and concrete path with gravel trail leading up to the fallsSmaller waterfall, with the ability to get up close and feel the spray of the waterEastern trailhead actually takes you to the Multnomah Falls parking area, and is a great walk to see the Washington side cliffs Wahkeena Falls is the third waterfall along U.S. 30, and is easily accessible up close. Photo by Mike SchultzWahkeena Falls is the third waterfall along U.S. 30, and is easily accessible up close. Photo by Mike SchultzMassive pine trees can be seen here near Wahkeena; many of which were scorched in the 2017 forest fires. Photo by Mike SchultzMassive pine trees can be seen here near Wahkeena; many of which were scorched in the 2017 forest fires. Photo by Mike Schultz7. Multnomah FallsThe mighty king of waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge; soaring down over 600 feetPlenty of parking is available, but make sure to plan ahead since weekends and holidays are very busyLarge walkways and a beautiful footbridge surround the fallsA gift shop, several food vendors, coffee, and the fancy restaurant inside the Multnomah Falls Lodge are all great parts of the experience   Shown here is the famous Multnomah Falls; Oregon’s second most visited site. Photo by Mike SchultzShown here is the famous Multnomah Falls; Oregon’s second most visited site. Photo by Mike SchultzVisitors to Multnomah Falls can be seen here on the small footbridge that spans the lower falls. Photo by Bailey GrannemanVisitors to Multnomah Falls can be seen here on the small footbridge that spans the lower falls. Photo by Bailey GrannemanIn the winter time, Multnomah Falls is often frozen over, as is seen here. Photo by Mike SchultzIn the winter time, Multnomah Falls is often frozen over, as is seen here. Photo by Mike SchultzMultnomah Falls cascades down a whopping 600 feet, and has a viewing platform at the very top accessible via trail. Photo by Jacob GrannemanMultnomah Falls cascades down a whopping 600 feet, and has a viewing platform at the very top accessible via trail. Photo by Jacob Granneman8. Horsetail FallsAnother easily accessible adventure, with parking, picnic tables and even a swimming area at the base of the falls pondA magnificent cascade of switchbacked water, falling over 175 feetSeveral stone viewing spots make for great photography opportunitiesSeveral trails can take you up to the smaller more intimate Ponytail Falls, just above Horsetail Just past Multnomah Falls, is the beautiful Horsetail Falls, shown here. Photo by Jacob GrannemanJust past Multnomah Falls, is the beautiful Horsetail Falls, shown here. Photo by Jacob GrannemanHorsetail Falls is a great place to stop and eat lunch since it is less busy than Multnomah Falls and has picnic tables. Photo by Mike SchultzHorsetail Falls is a great place to stop and eat lunch since it is less busy than Multnomah Falls and has picnic tables. Photo by Mike Schultz9. Bonneville DamAn easily accessible and fascinating historic landmark, with the opportunity to learn new thingsEducation opportunities about hydroelectric power and the construction of the dam are insideStunning views of the scope of the dam within the gorgeFish hatcheries are nearby, and you can learn about the conservation efforts for the river 10. Dry Creek FallsThis one is only accessible via trail, but offers some remarkable views and a great wilderness experienceThe falls are a gentle cascade rippling aver logs and rocks as it meanders down the hillsideSome of the area was affected by the 2017 forest fire, but the amenities remain openShown here is Dry Creek Falls, which lies further east into the Columbia River Gorge. Photo by Mike SchultzShown here is Dry Creek Falls, which lies further east into the Columbia River Gorge. Photo by Mike SchultzDry Creek Falls was adversely affected by the 2017 fires, but is now open again. Photo by Mike SchultzDry Creek Falls was adversely affected by the 2017 fires, but is now open again. Photo by Mike Schultz11. Wahclella FallsThis is one of the larger falls, which sits at the end of a 0.7-mile trail; the two-tiered cascade of water drops some 350 feetThere is a portable restroom on site, and a $5 day pass or Northwest Forest Pass is needed to park in the areaWahclella-Falls-Columbia-River-Gorge-01) Seen here is Wahclella Falls, the final major waterfall along the U.S. 30 route. Photo by Mike SchultzWahclella-Falls-Columbia-River-Gorge-01) Seen here is Wahclella Falls, the final major waterfall along the U.S. 30 route. Photo by Mike Schultz12. Wind Mountain TrailThis trail is a spectacular climb up to a breathtaking view of the gorge from high on the Washington cliffsidesThe hike crosses 2.3 miles and gains some 1,100 feet in elevationThe trail is rugged, with fallen logs and drop offs; dogs must be kept on a leash13. Beacon Rock State ParkLong rugged trails, waterfalls, rock climbing, and a magnificent switchback trail up the over 800 feet of Beacon Rock, all await you hereThe park is easily accessible with lots of parking and picnic areas; a Discover Pass is required for entryBeacon Rock State Park on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge, is a great place to explore, rock climb and hike the 800-foot rock, seen here. Photo from Public DomainBeacon Rock State Park on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge, is a great place to explore, rock climb and hike the 800-foot rock, seen here. Photo from Public Domain14. Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center MuseumA shining exhibit near Stevenson, WA featuring an OMSI-like experience regarding the history and exploration of the Columbia GorgeAdmission is $10 for adults and $6 for children15. Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and MuseumAn immense museum of natural history, this center sits just outside of the Dalles in the gorgeThe massive public areas can be rented for event spaces as wellTaxidermy animals of all kinds native to the region are featured throughout various exhibitsNative American cultures and artifacts are also present for discovery and learning    AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestshare 0 Previous : Open house for proposed improvements on NE 179th Street corridor set for Tue., Sept. 10 Next : Opinion: Thanks to those with enough energy to still fight the good fightAdvertisementThis is placeholder text guestLabel Pacific Northwest Day Trips: The Columbia River GorgePosted by Jacob GrannemanDate: Wednesday, September 4, 2019in: Peopleshare 0 I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. 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