United Technologies closes Goodrich acquisition

first_imgCollins Aerospace,United Technologies Corp (NYSE: UTX) today announced it has completed its acquisition of Goodrich Corporation, with a plant in Vergennes, Vermont, marking a major milestone for the company and strengthening its position in the commercial aerospace industry. Goodrich will be combined with Hamilton Sundstrand to create the new UTC Aerospace Systems business unit, headquartered in Charlotte, N.C.The increased scale, financial strength and complementary products resulting from the Goodrich acquisition significantly advance United Technologies’aerospace leadership at a time when the commercial aerospace industry is poised for growth.‘Throughout the history of our company, we have made many acquisitions, but Goodrich is among the few that stand out as truly transformational,’said UTC Chairman & Chief Executive Officer Louis Chênevert. ‘Adding the talented people, great technology and culture of innovation that has defined Goodrich truly positions us to better serve our aerospace customers with more advanced, integrated solutions for the next generation aircraft.‘The addition of Goodrich, along with our recent acquisition of a majority share in International Aero Engines, greatly advances our strategy of focusing on our core businesses and strengthens our position in the growing commercial aerospace market,’he continued.UTC also announced that Marshall Larsen, formerly Goodrich’s chairman and chief executive officer, is slated to join the United Technologies Board of Directors. Larsen is expected to be formally elected at the next scheduled meeting of UTC’s board on Sept. 12, 2012.‘Marshall’s global business experience and remarkable record of accomplishment while leading Goodrich will make him a valuable addition to UTC’s Board of Directors,’Chênevert said. ‘I look forward to continuing to work with him and to welcoming him to our board.’In addition, effective immediately, Alain Bellemare is appointed President & Chief Executive Officer of UTC Propulsion & Aerospace Systems. Bellemare will have leadership responsibility for Pratt & Whitney and for the newly created UTC Aerospace Systems. The presidents of Pratt & Whitney and of UTC Aerospace System’s two businesses ‘Aircraft Systems and Power, Controls & Sensing Systems ‘will report to him.‘Alain’s strong customer relationships, deep knowledge of the global aerospace markets, and proven leadership capabilities ‘most recently demonstrated during Goodrich integration planning ‘will serve him well and enable UTC Propulsion & Aerospace Systems to deliver unmatched value to customers and shareholders,’Chênevert said.United Technologies Corp., based in Hartford, Connecticut, is a diversified company providing high technology products and services to the building and aerospace industries. Visit the new UTC Aerospace Systems website at www.utcaerospacesystems.com(link is external).United Technologies Corp (NYSE: UTX) 7.26.2012last_img read more

Study finds brain architecture alters to compensate for depression

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook LinkedIn Share Emailcenter_img Share on Twitter Patients were randomized to receive active medication duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, or placebo. During the trial, patients receiving medication experienced significant improvement of symptoms compared with patients receiving placebo. In medication-treated patients, cortical thickness declined toward values found in healthy volunteers while placebo-treated patients showed a slight thickening of the cortex. According to Bansal, a researcher at CHLA and professor of pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, this finding suggests that placebo-treated patients continue to require compensation for their ongoing symptoms.“Although this study was conducted in adults, the methodology developed – pairing a randomized controlled trial with MRI scanning – can be applied to many other populations in both children and adults,” said Bansal. “Also, our observations of neuroplasticity suggest new biological targets for treatment of persons with neuropsychiatric disorders.” A study led by Ravi Bansal, PhD, and Bradley S. Peterson, MD, of The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has found structural differences in the cerebral cortex of patients with depression and that these differences normalize with appropriate medication. The study, published in Molecular Psychiatry on March 7, is the first to report within the context of a randomized, controlled trial, the presence of structural changes in the cerebral cortex during medication treatment for depression and the first to provide in vivo evidence for the presence of anatomical neuroplasticity in human brain.“Our findings suggest that thickening of the cerebral cortex is a compensatory, neuroplastic response that helps to reduce the severity of depressive symptoms,” said Peterson, director of the Institute of the Developing Mind at CHLA and professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. “Patients off medication have a thickened cortex, and the thicker it is, the fewer the symptoms they have. Treatment with medication then reduces the severity of symptoms, which in turn reduces the need for biological compensation in the brain – so that their cortex becomes thinner, reaching thickness values similar to those in healthy volunteers.”The investigators acquired anatomical brain scans at baseline and again at the end of the 10-week study period for 41 patients with chronic depression, while 39 healthy volunteers were scanned once. This study was conducted with adult patients treated at Columbia University, when Peterson and Bansal were faculty members.last_img read more