Everything You Wanted To Know About Android “Launchers” But Were Afraid To Ask

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement brian p rubin What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Google likes to promote its Android ecosystem with the tagline, “Be together, not the same.” Almost nowhere is that more apropos than in the first thing most users see when they pick up an Android phone: Its home-screen interface.Apple users can rest easy in the knowledge that any iPhone they pick up will look pretty much the same once they turn on the screen. The same is emphatically not true for Android, where most phone manufacturers have gone out of their way to customize Android’s basic interface with skins—known technically as “launchers”—that put their own stamp on a phone with differently styled design elements and even new features.These launchers have even become selling points for some companies. On Monday, for instance, LG released a video showing off its new UX 4.0 launcher, which will presumably show up on its G4 flagship phone later this April:You may spend most of your time in particular apps, but your phone’s home screen is still the first thing you see when you turn it on. It’s where you check the time, scan your notifications, move from app to app and—assuming you still do this—make and receive phone calls. It’s a pretty important part of what using a smartphone is all about.Yet many users don’t really understand why a Samsung Galaxy S6 looks and behaves so differently from a Moto X or HTC One M9. Even fewer probably grasp that they don’t have to live with the interface their smartphone manufacturer installs for them.Learning a little about launchers, it turns out, offers both power and freedom. Comparing the interface options from Samsung, Motorola, HTC and LG can help inform your decision if you’re in the market for a new phone. And knowing more about alternatives—from the stock Android interface offered by Google to other third-party skins also available in the Play Store—can set you free from a subpar launcher or even one that’s just grown tired for you.With all that in mind, let’s take a look at what the world of Android launchers has to offer.A Quick Tour Of AndroidFirst things first: The Android operating system and the launcher that controls the interface are two separate things. Of course, that’s not exactly obvious to the casual user.As you’d probably guess from the name, the Android OS is common to all Android phones. It handles all the phone’s basic functions, from shuttling data around and interfacing with underlying hardware (like, say, cameras and accelerometers) to managing apps. The launcher, by contrast, is basically just another app that sits on top of Android to display and manage the interface. It basically “launches” apps and widgets, sort of like the “Start” button in Windows used to do. Different launchers have different looks, sometimes offer different features, and may be more or less streamlined.Your new Android phone will come with a launcher pre-installed—typically one designed by the phone’s manufacturer. Let’s take a look.Stock Android (Nexus Devices, Motorola)If you ask most diehard Android fans, “stock” is the interface they prefer to all others. It’s Android as envisioned by Google itself, working simply and cleanly without any extra bells and whistles. For some users, it might be the most boring version of Android. For devotees, however, it’s the only version of Android worth using at all.Android Lollipop’s Material Design in action. Photo by Adriana Lee for ReadWriteStock Android—which, at the risk of oversimplifying things, is itself basically a launcher—is more easily defined by what it lacks than by its features. On the one hand, it’s something of a blank canvas for users to customize just how they like. On the other hand, it leaves the work of personalization to the user.And because it lacks the whiz-bang features of some of the other launchers described below, the virtues of stock Android can be a little difficult to grasp. Overall, however, its lack of extra features means it runs fast and clean, with fewer opportunities for OEM-installed software to get in the way or bog down the device’s performance.Stock Android also offers deep Google Search and Google Now integration. Each pane on the Android home screen provides a Google Search bar at the top, allowing for quick searching. And with just a few settings checked, you can say “OK Google” to your phone and issue voice commands to launch apps, search the web, send texts, place calls, and more. Motorola Android Lollipop, courtesy of MotorolaGoogle Now is the default launcher with stock Android devices, specifically anything in the Nexus line running Android 4.4 or later. Motorola’s smartphones, like the Moto X and Moto G, have skins installed that are extremely similar to stock Android.It’s also possible to install the Google Now launcher on other phones for a stock Android-like experience. More on that below.Bottom Line: Stock Android is the choice of Android purists. If you want a mobile experience that’s zippy and uncomplicated, go for stock Android.TouchWiz (Samsung)If you ever hear this sound in a crowded room, you’re almost certainly hearing Samsung’s TouchWiz. TouchWiz is easily identified because of its bright colors, a bluish glow on its notifications, and its cartoony icons. Samsung’s UI also gives a few more customization options for app organization and home screen layout, while stock Android is fairly Spartan in that regard. When most people think of Android, this is likely the version they’re imagining. That’s because of the sheer number of Samsung-made smartphones that have overrun the world—and TouchWiz runs on all of them. One analyst reported that Samsung’s phones accounted for nearly a full quarter of all smartphones sold in Q3 2014 in the world.While stock Android throws its Google search bar widget at the top of the display, TouchWiz puts it smack in the middle of your home screen. But while the bar is a permanent (if unobtrusive) fixture on stock, TouchWiz lets you remove it if you so desire. The navigation bar at the bottom also shunts the app drawer button to the right-most side of the display, as opposed to the center position it usually occupies on other Android UIs. TouchWiz also offers the option of using the “Easy Home” launcher, which simplifies the UI even further.TouchWiz’s Easy Home launcher features even BIGGER ICONS. Image via Android Stack Exchange.Samsung also has its own take on Google’s voice recognition. Called “S Voice,” it aims to deliver the same kinds of voice command functionality as Google Now, but head-to-head comparisons have shown that Google Now outperforms S Voice in terms of speed and functionality. Samsung Galaxy Note Edge, and Note 4, both running TouchWiz. Both feature the Google Search widget in the center, with the app drawer button on the right side, a placement unique to TouchWiz. Photo by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite.TouchWiz also offers users the Multi Window feature, which puts running apps on-screen side by side. It’s a nice addition that gives Samsung an edge in terms of productivity and multitasking.On the other hand, these extra features and options can sometimes weigh down a phone’s speed—though that’s something of a concern no matter which non-stock Android you’re using. In my own experience with TouchWiz, sometimes apps would hang, crash, or simply suffer from unexplainable bugs. My old Samsung Epic 4G crashed frequently, with trouble running Google Maps. My girlfriend’s Galaxy Light has shown some troublesome bugs for months, such as a display that refuses to turn off unless you manually hit the power button. Recent reviews of the Galaxy S6 say that Samsung used a lighter hand on its latest version of TouchWiz, making it more usable than previous iterations. It’s possible, then, that S Voice has grown up and the launcher is more reliable overall. Bottom Line: If you want to use the latest Samsung flagship, be ready for TouchWiz. It’s bright, and has lots of user-friendly options in terms of customization, multitasking, and access. But watch out for the bugs.Sense (HTC)Where Samsung’s TouchWiz is bright and cartoony, HTC’s Sense is a bit slicker and stylized. Its colors are a bit more muted with more minimally drawn icons. Sense starts with a time and weather widget at the top of the home screen, but an otherwise standard navigation bar layout on the bottom. The newest version of Sense brings Themes with it, which gives users a starting point in terms of wallpaper, icons, and color schemes from which to further customize their experience. Some of the themes available on HTC Sense.Sense also has options for customizing the navigation bar as well as a few other organizational widgets that other versions of Android don’t offer, like Sense Home and BlinkFeed. The former organizes apps you’ll need depending on where you are in the world (like home, work, etc.), while the latter is reminiscent of the suggestions offered by Google Now. Users can also use Sense to more easily customize their lock screens with the information they want to see at a glance, like appointments, weather, and email.Prior to the release of Android Lollipop, one of Sense’s biggest draws was its stylish rendering of the operating system and its slick animations. Lollipop’s “Material Design” styling catches stock Android up in that regard, which could make many of Sense’s other features feel unnecessary or redundant. Once again, I had a less-than-stellar experience with Sense on my Evo 4G LTE, which had the unfortunate habit of dropping my Wi-Fi network even though its indicator showed  I was still connected. Sense also tended to kill tasks or apps that were running in the background—technically a good way to save on battery and RAM, but still annoying when I wanted to resume a song or podcast I’d started earlier.Still, Sense has a unique style that stands out, and is far less garish than most other Android UIs. And with the forthcoming release of the One M9, it’s possible that HTC has made its latest version of Sense even better.Bottom Line: Sense has undeniable style, and gives your phone a premium software feel. Some of the extras HTC packs into Sense aren’t particularly necessary, but they might be fun additions to your mobile life. UX (LG)LG’s long-running rivalry with Samsung has resulted in an Android UI that shares a lot in common with TouchWiz. The simply titled “UX” (which, presumably, stands for “user experience”) isn’t quite as colorful or bright as TouchWiz, but it does offer some of the same kinds of features.Like Samsung’s Multi Window for same-screen multitasking, UX has QSlide and Dual Window: the former opens a few specific apps in separate floating windows on the display, while Dual Window, well, opens two app windows side-by-side. Dual Window in action on the LG G Flex.Some new features revealed (and helpfully translated from Korean by SlashGear) by LG to be coming to UX 4.0 include Quick Shot for fast photo snapping even when the display is off, Smart Alert for activity and wardrobe suggestions based on that day’s weather forecast, and a drag and drop feature to move Facebook events into your phone’s calendar app. UX 4.0 also features Knock Code, which can activate and unlock the phone’s display with a user-set pattern that they tap on the screen itself:I’ve never actually owned an LG handset, so I can’t speak to personal experience in terms of UX’s overall performance and stability. However, it stands to reason that, like TouchWiz and Sense, UX’s extra features might keep Android from running as quickly or as smoothly as the stock OS.Bottom Line: Some interesting photography options and multitasking capabilities make UX an interesting up-and-comer in the world of Android skins. It’s got a few strong similarities to TouchWiz, so it’s possible that deciding between the two could have more to do with a buyer’s hardware preferences in the end.“Be Together, Not The Same”Overall, each different Android launcher has its own advantages and drawbacks. For what it’s worth, I’ve long wanted an app on my Nexus 5 that gives me the same kind of multitasking features offered by Samsung and LG. Most third party app solutions I’ve found seemed sketchy in terms of adware or too disruptive to the overall Android experience, so I’ll keep pining. But for my money, even without single-screen multitasking, the best Android is pure Android. Meanwhile, if you hate the skin you find on your new phone, there are no shortage of launchers to choose from. Just look them up on the Play Store, download and install, and suddenly it’s like having a brand-new phone. (Well, kind of.)On the original Kindle Fire, I was desperate to get away from Amazon’s terrible FireOS (a heavily modified, forked version of Android). I enjoyed switching to the Go Launcher EX, but even more launchers have been released since then.If you have a different take on these Android UIs, let me know in the comments below.  Lead image courtesey of Kārlis Dambrāns; Android images courtesy of Google; HTC Sense image courtesy of HTC; LG Dual Window image courtesy of LGcenter_img Related Posts Tags:#Android#Explainer#Google#HTC Sense#LG#LG UX#Motorola#Samsung#Samsung TouchWiz#Sense#TouchWiz#UX Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

The Wireless Power Merger Is Official

first_imgTags:#A4WP#Alliance for Wireless Power#Inductive Charging#Inductive Power#merger#PMA#Power Matters Alliance#qi#Resonant Charging#Ron Resnick#wireless charging#wireless power#WPC Related Posts 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… brian p rubin Two of the three major wireless-charging standard groups—the Alliance for Wireless Power (A4WP) and the Power Matters Alliance (PMA)—finally announced Monday that their plans to merge are official. After over a year of discussion, PMA and A4WP are officially becoming one, leaving the Wireless Power Consortium and its Qi wireless charging platform as the sole alternative.While two is better than three for hardware developers trying to sort out which wireless-charging bandwagon to jump on, the combined entity has technical challenges to overcome in unifying its own efforts.Oh, and it needs a name, too.Inductive Versus ResonantThe PMA’s board of directors includes representatives from the likes of Duracell, Powermat Technologies, Flextronics, AT&T, and Starbucks, to name a few. A4WP, meanwhile, counts Qualcomm, Samsung, and Broadcom on its board, among others. The union of these two organizations means a whole lot of tech companies coming together to form a wireless charging standard that PMA president Ron Resnick hopes will change the way the world powers its electronics.The Powermat wireless charging station is based on PMA’s charging standard.“We’d like to see this [organization] really be the [organization] that takes it global and the biggest companies in the world have bet on it,” Resnick said in an interview. “We plan to really be aggressive about building out and seeing infrastructures go everywhere for our wireless charging. So we have a lot of work ahead of us, but that’s our plan.”Resnick said that the newly established entity plans on figuring out a name in a couple of months. What’s more important is that when the A4WP and PMA join forces, they’ll combine both of their wireless charging standards into one multi-mode solution for device-makers to rely on. Currently, PMA’s standard relies on magnetic induction, which requires devices to be placed on a charging surface for power transfer to happen. On the other hand, A4WP’s charging standard relies on resonance charging, which pumps power out at a a greater distance, meaning devices can be a foot or two away to receive power.“It just seemed like it was a natural evolution path to combine the two into one industry org that really does one thing: the goal is to deliver a really good experience for users regardless of what the use case is and having the different technologies work collaboratively together under one roof made a lot of sense,” said Resnick. “So both boards of directors agreed to that, and so we’re real happy that we’ve now signed the merger agreement, and we will be one industry organization.”The WPC’s Qi standard remains an outlier, albeit one that boasts a growing list of high-profile products with its wireless charging standard built in—devices made by the likes of LG, HTC, Motorola, and Sony, to name but a few. The Samsung Galaxy S6 supports charging standards from both the PMA and Qi. The Samsung Galaxy S6 is compatible with PMA and Qi wireless charging stations.Resnick explained that this is a result of broad similarities between Qi and PMA’s inductive charging technology.“The chip companies who manufacture the inductive technology, they’re already doing dual-mode,” he said, adding that their similarities make it relatively easy for devices like the Galaxy S6 to support both standards.The new organization’s edge comes from the fact that it’ll also boast the longer-range resonant charging technology under the same umbrella.“You can have a phone that has our resonant technology and inductive and it’s going to work,” he said. “We think that has the better story.”Why This MattersWhile it’s still not a widely used technology, wireless charging is clearly the next step in how we power our gadgets. It affects hardware makers and consumers. And common standards drive down prices over time, benefiting builders and buyers alike. Now that there are only two organizations vying for supremacy, we’ll likely start to see a lot more devices that offer wireless charging technology. With a more binary choice in front of them, device makers will soon pick a side, just like manufacturers once did during VHS and Betamax’s infamous format wars (and the less memorable Blu-ray and HD-DVD battle a few decades later). It’s very possible that the combined might of the PMA and A4WP could be enough to make their wireless charging stand out against the WPC’s Qi standard. Then again, if Resnick gets his wish, WPC will come into the fold before too long.“I’d love to see a unification of the whole ecosystem,” he said. “I would absolutely encourage the WPC to approach us and figure out how we can get their inductive technology.… We’d be happy to do it.”Lead photo by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite; Powermat image courtesy of Powermat; Galaxy S6 image courtesy of Samsungcenter_img How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Why You Love Online Quizzes Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

What is Industry 4.0?

first_img5 Industries Destined for Technological Disruption The Ultimate Checklist on Ways to Prevent IoT D… Related Posts The move from humans working with computers to computers working without humans is almost upon us, and some are already calling it Industry 4.0 – or the fourth industrial revolution.For those not keeping up with your industrial revolutions, the first was considered launched by the use of steam and water power, the second by the use of electricity, and the third by the introduction of computers in the workplace.See Also: London calling: UK regulator creates new IoT spectrum licenseThe name Industry 4.0 was first coined by the German Government, and represents the implementation of artificial intelligence, big data, and the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) in the factories.It might be the first revolution where humans are not required, according to some. Once computers can talk to each other and automate the assembly line, and AI can understand issues and address them ahead of time, there might be no need for humans.That might be a tad overzealous, at least in the first few decades. We assume humans will be kept in jobs as companies test artificial intelligence and robots in the workplace, to avoid disaster.Industry 4.0 affecting all industriesThe revolution will not be for just factories, however. Entire sectors – from fast food giant McDonalds to mega-retailer Walmart – will move some of its operations towards automatization and digitization. Starbucks has already revealed some of its plans, which include customized menus for every customer, using big data and artificial intelligence to understand what you want.The benefits of this revolution include a much cheaper workforce – if robots are swapped for humans – and the ability to use artificial intelligence to solve complex problems and expedite the assembly line.We’re seeing the foundations of this revolution being laid now. Factories are starting to invest in 3D printers for cheaper manufacturing, IIoT for connectivity between machines, and big data to analyze every process and boost efficiency.However, it might still be a few decades till this revolution is in full effect. And for now, we still don’t know the full extent of the automation process. Tags:#artificial intelligence#Big Data#Germany#industry 4.0#Internet of Things center_img David Curry How IoT Will Transform Cold Chain Logistics For… Electronic Design is Utilizing AI-Enabled Solu…last_img read more

Can IoT make bike rides safer?

first_imgTags:#Big Data#Brompton#folding bike#Internet of Things#IoT#London For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… London-based folding bike manufacturer Brompton has revealed an internet-connected prototype of its bike, utilizing the power of the Internet of Things (IoT) to manage and provide information to the rider about the city of London.Foldable bikes have become popular in London for their portability, allowing riders to take them into an office rather than leave them chained up outside. Brompton wants to make riding in the city even more safe and smart by taking information like the weather and traffic levels to change routes in real-time and warn of any issues on the roads.See Also: Vodafone and Philips to help cities cut lighting costsAdding internet connectivity to a bike opens up the possibility of third-party apps, like Fitbit and Google Maps, which could more accurately save the amount of calories burned and show you detailed maps of the entire city.Bike rides with more sensors besides eyes and earsBrompton has added sensors capable of tracking pollution levels and air quality, which may be sent to London’s environmental commission and other third-party organizations. This could be a vital public service, as London continues to lower congestion in the city center and persuade more people to bike it to work.As more internet-connected Brompton bikes hit the streets, we might even see the bikes connect to London’s traffic system, according to the Inquisitr, giving traffic monitors more information to find hotspots and reduce bicycle congestion in the city.Despite the upsides to internet-connectivity on a bicycle, others find the situation worrisome, if hackers are able to intercept communications. What if hackers change routes for bikers or are able to track the route a rider takes to work everyday and stalk them. These are all real security questions that Brompton hasn’t been quick to address.Brompton has been manufacturing its iconic bike for more than forty years, but that doesn’t mean it is sound when it comes to data security. Like any other internet-connected device, we’re going to have to see major investment in preventing hackers from intercepting communications.center_img David Curry 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Related Posts last_img read more

Electing Out of Interest Deduction Limit and Switching to ADS Is Not an Accounting Method Change

first_imgA taxpayer that elects out of the  business interest deduction limits won’t need to file an accounting method change when switching to the MACRS alternative depreciation system (ADS), according to the IRS.During recent informal remarks, the IRS said it plans to allow electing farmers and real estate businesses to make the required switch to ADS under “change in use” regulations. The changes described in these regulations are not accounting method changes.  This means electing taxpayers wont’t have to:file Form 3115, Application for Change in Accounting Method, orinclude a Code Sec. 481(a) adjustment in income.The IRS discussed its plans at the Capital Recovery and Leasing Section at the 2018 ABA Mid-Year Meeting.Electing Farming and Real Property Trade or Businesses Must Use ADSThe Tax Cuts and Jobs Act generally limits the business interest deduction for taxpayers with more than $25 million in average annual gross receipts to the sum of:business interest income; and30% of adjusted taxable income.A farming or real property trade or business, however, may make an irrevocable election out of I.R.C. §163(j).The election, however, comes at a price. A farming business making the election must depreciate any MACRS property with a recovery period of 10 years or greater using ADS. An electing real property trade or business must use ADS to depreciate:residential rental property;nonresidential real property; andqualified improvement property.Under ADS, property is depreciated using the straight-line method over a depreciation period that is usually longer than the period that would otherwise apply.Unfortunately, the effective date of the provision is for “tax years beginning after 2017” and not for “property placed in service after 2017.” This means that an electing taxpayer must also depreciate property placed in service before 2018 using ADS.Accounting Method Change v. Change in UseGenerally, when a taxpayer changes its method of depreciating MACRS property, an accounting method change must be filed on Form 3115. In addition, a Code Sec. 481(a) adjustment is required. In the case of a taxpayer switching to ADS, the section 481(a) adjustment, which is included in income, is the difference between:the depreciation previously claimed; andthe depreciation that would have been claimed if ADS applied when the asset was first placed in service.Representatives from the Chief Counsel’s Office, however, unofficially indicated at the mid-year meeting that the IRS will likely issue guidance that allows a taxpayer to apply the change in use regulations. This means an electing taxpayer will recover the remaining undepreciated basis of pre-2018 assets using ADS over the ADS recovery period that remains at the beginning of 2018. Previously claimed depreciation in excess of ADS depreciation is not included in income. This change is not considered an accounting method change.Example:  ABC, a calendar-year real property trade or business, placed 27.5 year residential rental property costing $100,000 in service in January 2010 and makes an irrevocable election out of the business interest deduction limitation in 2018. The ADS recovery period for residential rental property placed in service before 2018 is 40 years. As of December 31, 2017, the property has been depreciated for seven years and eleven and one-half months. Only eleven and one-half month’s depreciation was allowed in 2010 under the mid-month convention. Depreciation claimed through December 31, 2017 is $28,937. Under the change in use regulations, ABC will depreciate the remaining $71,063 basis using the straight-line method over the remaining ADS recovery period of 32 years and ½ month beginning on January 1, 2018.In this example, no switch to ADS is required if the residential rental property is fully depreciated before 2018. In this situation there is no undepreciated basis to recover using ADS even though the 40 year ADS recovery period has not expired.The IRS officials gave no definite time frame for issuing the expected guidance. However, it should be available for the 2019 filing season.By Ray G. Suelzer, J.D., LL.M.Login to read more about the limits on business deductions on CCHAnswerConnect.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Additional Extension of Temporary Relief Provided for Wisconsin Energy Emergencies (Notice 2019-04)

first_imgThe IRS has provided another extension of the temporary dyed fuel relief provided in section 3.02 of Notice 2017-30, 2017-21 I.R.B. 1248 (TAXDAY, 2017/05/04, I.2). Notice 2017-30 was published in response to energy emergencies in Wisconsin resulting from the permanent shutdown of the segment of the West Shore Pipeline between Milwaukee and Green Bay. The rules originally applied to removals of dyed diesel fuel and kerosene from Green Bay terminals on or after October 31, 2017, and before May 4, 2018. An extension to the time period had been provided by section 3 of Notice 2018-39, 2018-20, I.R.B. 582 (TAXDAY, 2018/04/27, I.5) through December 31, 2018. An additional extension to the time period has been provided and extended relief will be available beginning January 1, 2019 and ending December 31, 2019.Relief ExtensionCode Sec. 4081(a)(1)(A)(ii) imposes tax on the removal of taxable fuel, which includes diesel fuel and kerosene, from any terminal. Code Sec. 4082(a) provides that the tax imposed by Code Sec. 4081 does not apply to diesel fuel and kerosene that is indelibly dyed in accordance with Treasury regulations, meets any marking requirements prescribed by Treasury regulations, and is destined for a nontaxable use.For the period beginning on January 1, 2019, and ending on December 31, 2019, if any person (the position holder) that removes diesel fuel or kerosene that satisfies the requirements of Code Sec. 4082 from a Green Bay terminal establishes that a prior tax was paid with respect to the removal of such fuel from a Milwaukee or Madison terminal, then an amount equal to the prior tax paid shall be allowed as a refund (without interest) to the position holder in the same manner as if it were an overpayment of tax imposed by Code Sec. 4081.Notice 2017-59, 2017-45 I.R.B. 484 (TAXDAY, 2017/10/20, I.5), provides guidance on how persons eligible for relief may submit claims for refund. The extension of temporary relief is not available with respect to any transaction for which one or more conditions set forth in section 3.02 of Notice 2017-59 are not satisfied or for any refund claim that fails to comply with the procedures set forth in sections 3.03 and 3.04 of Notice 2017-59. Also, any reference in Notice 2017-59 to removals from a Milwaukee terminal shall be read to also include removals from a Madison terminal.Notice 2019-04Other References:Code Sec. 4081CCH Reference – ETR ¶8915.015CCH Reference – ETR ¶8915.06CCH Reference – ETR ¶8915.315Code Sec. 4082CCH Reference – ETR ¶9215.05CCH Reference – ETR ¶9215.055CCH Reference – ETR ¶9215.25Tax Research ConsultantCCH Reference – TRC EXCISE: 6,102.40CCH Reference – TRC EXCISE: 6,110.15Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Lincoln University President talks class attendance

first_imgYou can’t get your college degree if you don’t go to class.Lincoln University President Dr. Jerald Jones Woolfolk admits it’s hard to keep students in school all the way through to graduation.“Our problem is not recruiting students, our problem is entertaining students.  We have put mechanisms in place now where we can actually see if a student is in class.”Lincoln’s accounting firm recently wrapped up an assessment of the college’s finances. Woolfolk says finances are “stable.”She adds that the firm pointed out several areas that could be updated or reorganized.last_img

Anandtech reviews Dunnington 6-Core Processor

first_imgI was pointed to a review on Anandtech’s website of the new Xeon 74xx (Dunnington) 6-core processor. The article does a pretty comprehensive performance review of the new server CPU, with benchmark results compared to other platforms.A good read – Check it out!last_img

GoDaddy vPro Landing Site

first_imgI’ve been asking GoDaddy for over a year to provide a specific Intel vPro site to help customers buy Remote Configuration Certificates.  Glad to see someone was able to get them to add a link on thier site.  http://help.godaddy.com/article/5260last_img

Four Reasons for Using Digest Master Passwords with Intel SCS

first_imgDo you have an additional reason for using Digest Master Passwords?  Please do tell With the contextual understanding above, here are the four reasons to use Digest Master Password (DMP)Simple to add an additional Intel SCS or in disaster recovery scenarios – If you have already configured Intel AMT systems using Digest Master Password, additional Intel SCS instances can start communicating with them immediately.   All you need to provide is the DMP in the Intel SCS console.  (I’m looking forward to Intel AMT capable applications using DMP)No Database Required – In the past, a randomized password option could be used with each individual password stored in the Intel AMT database.   If you lose or corrupt the database, you lose the passwords.   This is not true with DMP – since the randomized password is calculated dynamically per an algorithm.   (Again – I hope in the future Intel AMT capable applications will use DMP)Simplifies reconfiguration, delta configuration, and unconfiguration options – If you have manually typed the ACUconfig commands, you noticed a command option “/Adminpassword”.   This is the Intel AMT admin password, and if you must directly specify it in the command line there is a security risk.   In contrast, if DMP is enabled the ACUconfig command execution will determine the Intel AMT admin password.Easy to maintain-  Intel SCS will remember the last 8 DMP’s used.   If you update the DMP on the Intel SCS console, the change can be applied to systems in your environment causing a new random Intel AMT admin password per client to be generated and assigned.   Until that job has completed, which is complicated with systems that may be disconnected from the network for a period of time, there is a good possibility that some systems may not get the update immediately.   No worries – Intel SCS knows the previous DMPs used and can apply those if needed.Ensure you secure the DMPA final thought for this blog – be sure to secure the Digest Master Password.   As shown above, the individual randomized passwords are accessible via the Intel SCS console.   To calculate or obtain the Digest Master Password requires access to the Intel_RCS_Master_Password WMI namespace as shown below Among the many enhancements with latest generation Intel SCS releases, one that you may have overlooked is Digest Master PasswordsFirst – some contextual understandingThe idea of a Digest Master Password (DMP) is to provide one password to Intel SCS which is used to randomize the Intel AMT admin password on every system configured.To help put that in context, shown below is the Intel SCS console view to enable and set the Digest Master PasswordOnce a Digest Master Password has been established, when defining the Network Setting within a Configuration Profile, a third option appears to “Use Master Password to create a password for each system”Those who have appropriate permissions to the Intel SCS console can lookup the password of an individual system.   As shown below, all of the systems have been configured using Digest Master Password.   The per-system Intel AMT password is a unique string.   The notepad provides a few example randomized passwords due to Digest Master Password.last_img read more

Intel® vPro™ Technology: Proven Value in Four User Cases

first_imgTo increase our ability to maintain, manage, and protect PCs while decreasing management costs, in 2011 Intel IT completed deployment of Intel® vPro™ technology across the entire enterprise. We have evaluated the business value of four use cases based on Intel vPro technology that have been deployed at Intel.  In each case, we found that Intel vPro technology reduces management costs and decreases downtime – resulting in greater employee productivity.  Read the paper for more detailslast_img

AI at work: 8 ways businesses use it today

first_imgArtificial intelligence that’s indistinguishable from human intelligence hasn’t arrived yet. But early examples of AI are sprouting up in a variety of industries, with businesses using it to improve operations, cut costs, and connect with customers. As more businesses turn to the technology, the market for AI products and services will grow to $36.8 billion in 2025 from $643.7 million this year, research firm Tractica projectsOpens in a new window.Here are eight examples of AI at work today.1. AI bank tellersBanks are using AI-assisted programs and apps to improve customers’ online experience, including more intuitive interfaces, more effective customer service, and more secure transactions, according to an August reportOpens in a new window by Jost Hopperman, vice president of Banking Applications and Architecture at research firm Forrester.For example, DBS Bank claims its  Digibank appOpens in a new window understands spoken customer requests to check balances, find interest rates, and make payments, among other tasks.2. Self-driving carA self-driving car requires a lot of sensors to accurately perceive and respond to its environment in real time. Automakers process data collected from the sensors to build and adjust the predictive models guiding these real-time decisions, such as acting appropriately in a construction zone, or braking to avoid an obstacle. BMW, Google, Toyota, and Tesla are among those pouring millions of dollarsOpens in a new window into efforts to develop autonomous vehicles, many of which are already on the road.Autonomous VehicleBecause a car can’t rely on communication with a cloud-based computing system for an instant answer, it needs to be able to make decisions itself. Its development incorporates a common architectural aspect of AI: model training in the data center, followed by deployment on edge devices.3. Air travelAirlines are increasingly using deep learning neural networks and machine learning systems to optimize routes and resource use. With multiple destinations plus complications like traffic, weather, and fuel costs, defining or altering route plans is a complex task. London-based EasyJet reportedly  uses AI systemsOpens in a new window not only to plan its flight schedules, but to manage supplies onboard for improved customer satisfaction and revenue.Improving AI technology is helping these organizations respond to unexpected events in real time.4. Lowering hospital readmission ratesThe University of Pennsylvania Health System uses analytics and machine learning in its Penn Signals program to identify inpatients who, upon discharge, are at risk of readmission due to heart failure. The system, which Intel Chief Data Scientist Bob Rogers characterizes as early AI, correlates a diverse range of medications and health factors and sends a text notifying doctors to take additional steps for patients it flags, even if no formal diagnosis has been given.Health system officials say the system has identified about 20 percent more patientsOpens in a new window who need added services before being discharged, improving care for the patients and saving money for the health system. (UPHS has partnered with Intel to help create and refine this system.)5. Fraud detectionCredit card issuers, telecom companies and others use neural networks to analyze transactional and behavioral data, looking for patterns that indicate fraud. According to Visa’s Viewpoints blog, the credit card issuer processes  more than 82 billion transactionsOpens in a new window per year, and aims to analyze 100% of its data to improve its models for making real-time fraud decisions, looking at hundreds of criteria including geo-location and purchase history. Fraud techniques change over time, as criminals look for weakest defensive spots, which machine learning is uniquely capable of keeping up with.6. Reading radiology imagesRadiology images require great expertise to read correctly. A medical program applying machine-learning algorithms as it scans a large number of images can discover patterns or degrees of subtlety that humans miss, thus improving the accuracy of diagnoses and reducing the number of required follow-up tests.It’s an early example of the kind of projects that could soon be commonplace in healthcare. In hospitals and medical-research labs, “AI is being used to tackle that data overload, and extract information in a way that’s actionable,” says Venkat Rajan, global director of the Visionary Healthcare Program at business consultancy Frost & Sullivan.7. Buying, selling, and displaying adsMore than two-thirds of all U.S. ad buying on mobile channels this year is being run through “programmatic advertising,” according to research firm eConsultancy, using AI to analyze audience demographics and ad performance to help buyers distribute, adjust, and monitor spending.Using platforms such as DataXu and MediaMath, buyers engage in real-time bidding for ad space. They also retarget or customize ads based on cookies indicating that an individual has visited a particular page or already seen a particular ad. Retargeted ads were   than other ads in an online campaign by carmaker Mazda.8. Chatbots and virtual assistantsRetailers, banks, and others are using virtual assistants as a conversational interface for text-based customer interactions—in other words, chat. For example, according to HSBC, its  chatbot ‘OliviaOpens in a new window’ can answer potential customers’ questions about credit card and account offerings. AI is providing rapid advances in natural language processing, though there’s still room for improvement (see Chatbots articleOpens in a new window.)last_img read more

IG: EPA Needs Plan for Climate Change Research

first_imgNote: This item has been corrected. It previously cited GAO as the source of the report. The Environmental Protection Agency needs an overall plan for its research on climate change, according to a report released Monday by the agency’s Inspector General. It’s not clear how the agency decides what research to focus on, the IG said. The agency’s Office of Research and Development doesn’t keep its scientific results in a central repository, nor does it communicate them quickly enough. “ORD’s current climate change research products and plans do not meet users’ needs in timeliness or scope,” the report notes. EPA spent $36.6 million on climate change research in fiscal year 2008, a tiny fraction of the federal spending in that area. In comments to the IG, agency officials wrote that they intend to issue a memo on research prioritization by the end of the year. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Meet Steve Koonin, Chu’s Science Man at DOE

first_imgAnother brainy Steve has joined the Obama Administration’s science effort. Steven Koonin, a former provost of the California Institute of Technology who has been BP’s chief scientist for the past 4 years, was nominated last week for the position of under secretary for science at the Department of Energy. Koonin, pictured on the right, will join two other high-profile scientists at DOE, Secretary Steven Chu (left) and recently nominated Under Secretary for Energy Kristina Johnson, currently provost at Johns Hopkins University. Koonin and Chu know each other well. Nature gets the basics on their connections, which involve a BP-funded, $500 million research program on biofuels and other new sources of energy. Now Koonin will run a rapidly expanding research program that is already the largest funder of physical sciences in the country.(PHOTO: Lawrence Berkeley National Labs)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Might Google Have Been Israeli? The Little Choices That Shape U.S. Innovation

first_imgGoogle has been an American technological success story if there ever was one, leading to billions of dollars in technological innovation, and, recently, fledgling research in important fields like energy, public health and brain science. But maybe this high-tech juggernaut might have ended up in Israel, an interview with the mother of Google co-founder Sergey Brin suggests.Eugenia Brin explained that in 1979 the Brin family, from Russia, was deciding between Israel and the United States, and an organization called the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society helped them with their move to Maryland.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Sergey Brin, who was 6 years old when his family emigrated to the United States, started Google as a computer science grad student at Stanford University. There’s no way of knowing, but it’s certainly possible he might have ended up at one of Israel’s top universities if he wanted to, and started his company in the Tel Aviv suburbs instead of northern California.last_img read more

Copenhagen a Failure? Blame China, Says One Informed Source

first_imgJournalist Mark Lynas was “in the room,” as he puts it, as President Barack Obama wrangled with the most powerful leaders in the world in the waning moments of the Copenhagen talks. Lynas says China is at fault for scuttling the deal:To those who would blame Obama and rich countries in general, know this: it was China’s representative who insisted that industrialised country targets, previously agreed as an 80% cut by 2050, be taken out of the deal. “Why can’t we even mention our own targets?” demanded a furious Angela Merkel. Australia’s prime minister, Kevin Rudd, was annoyed enough to bang his microphone. Brazil’s representative too pointed out the illogicality of China’s position. Why should rich countries not announce even this unilateral cut? The Chinese delegate said no, and I watched, aghast, as Merkel threw up her hands in despair and conceded the point. Now we know why – because China bet, correctly, that Obama would get the blame for the Copenhagen accord’s lack of ambition.China, backed at times by India, then proceeded to take out all the numbers that mattered.last_img read more

Senators Oppose Plan to Dismantle NIH Resources Center

first_imgTwo senators, including the chair of a powerful spending panel, have added their voices to a flood of complaints from researchers about the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) plan to abolish its center for research resources to make room for a new translational sciences center. In a brief letter sent 1 February to NIH and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Senators Daniel Inouye (D-HI) and Mark Begich (D-AK) express “concern and opposition” about NIH’s plan to move the Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program out of the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR). The IDeA program supports research infrastructure in states with relatively little NIH funding. The lawmakers write that the “NCRR staff has worked diligently” to get to know research in their states and that “a disruption of the placement and expertise at NCRR will only serve to dismantle the laudable work that has been accomplished.” The senators are also concerned about NIH’s proposal to separate IDeA from another NCRR program for minority institutions. (NIH’s straw model would put the Research Centers in Minority Institutions in NIH’s institute for minority health, and IDeA in an interim unit in the NIH director’s office.) “The synergy that exists between these programs needs to continue and separation will exact an unnecessary toll on each,” the lawmakers write in the letter to NIH Director Francis Collins and HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. (Nature’s blog obtained and posted the letter online yesterday.)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Inouye is chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee, which holds the purse strings for NIH’s budget. A staffer for the House Appropriations Committee has also raised concerns about the proposed dismantling of NCRR and creation of the new center, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). Whether NIH is sticking to its plan to create NCATS in October will become clear on Monday when President Barack Obama releases his 2012 budget request. NIH officials will also elaborate on the reorganization in a 23 February teleconference meeting of an advisory board that recommended the creation of NCATS.last_img read more

FDA’s Expanded Mandate in Limbo

first_imgThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could get a big budget boost this year, with the president requesting $4.3 billion, more than a third of it from regulatory fees paid by companies. That total is more than $1 billion higher than the 2010 budget figure. FDA has planned a number of new initiatives and is enjoying expanded authority in areas like food safety and tobacco control. But despite an outwardly rosy picture, the agency still doesn’t have the cash in hand it needs to fulfill an expanded mandate. 2012 may or may not be the year when FDA gets to flex some new muscles. Among other things, the president is requesting $324 million for a new food safety initiative, to allow FDA to implement the recently passed Food Safety Modernization Act, designed to reduce food-borne disease. FDA also wants to put $49 million into strengthening regulatory science, for example by finding better ways to understand drug toxicity. A continuing resolution just passed by appropriators in the House of Representatives provides only $3.3 billion for FDA’s 2011 budget—far short of the Administration’s 2012 objective—suggesting that it may be difficult to find common ground. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)See our complete coverage of Budget 2012.last_img read more

Podcast: Thinking About Thinking

first_imgWASHINGTON, D.C.—Do animals know enough to know what they don’t know? When do children begin to develop this “metacognition”? And how can this knowledge be applied to disorders such as autism? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats with John David Smith of the University of Buffalo in New York, who spoke about metacognition at a session here on Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (which publishes ScienceNOW).Follow our full coverage of AAAS 2011.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more